Calvary Road Baptist Church

“THE LORD’S RIDE INTO JERUSALEM”

Matthew 21.8-11; Mark 11.8-10; Luke 19.36-44; John 12.17-19

 

We previously reflected on the Lord’s claims of deity by the simple act of identifying Himself as the Lord and directing two of His disciples to arrange for the donkey colt, His right of requisition.

At this time we consider our Lord’s actual ride into Jerusalem: 

First, CHRIST’S DESCENT FROM THE MOUNT OF OLIVES 

Matthew 21.8-9: 

8  And a very great multitude spread their garments in the way; others cut down branches from the trees, and strawed them in the way.

9  And the multitudes that went before, and that followed, cried, saying, Hosanna to the Son of David: Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord; Hosanna in the highest. 

Mark 11.8-10: 

8  And many spread their garments in the way: and others cut down branches off the trees, and strawed them in the way.

9  And they that went before, and they that followed, cried, saying, Hosanna; Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord:

10 Blessed be the kingdom of our father David, that cometh in the name of the Lord: Hosanna in the highest. 

Luke 19.36-38: 

36  And as he went, they spread their clothes in the way.

37  And when he was come nigh, even now at the descent of the mount of Olives, the whole multitude of the disciples began to rejoice and praise God with a loud voice for all the mighty works that they had seen;

38  Saying, Blessed be the King that cometh in the name of the Lord: peace in heaven, and glory in the highest.

As the Lord Jesus Christ descended from the shoulder of the Mount of Olives the crowd that gathered around Him grew. Remembering that religious pilgrims were entering the city for the Passover observance, there would be thousands upon thousands of people pouring into the city. Imagine, then, people spreading their clothes along the way, knowing that throwing clothes down in those days was different than throwing clothes down in our day, with no livestock roaming around, and no unpaved surfaces to walk on. To spread your clothes in such fashion in those days meant discarding your clothes, quite a commitment.

Taking their cue from Him riding on a donkey colt and realizing the prophetic implications, “a very great multitude spread their garments in the way; others cut down branches from the trees, and strawed them in the way.” Precisely why they did this, no one knows for sure. However, Second Kings 9.13 records the response of servants in the royal household of the northern kingdom of Israel to Jehu centuries earlier when they were informed that he had been anointed king by the LORD: 

“Then they hasted, and took every man his garment, and put it under him on the top of the stairs, and blew with trumpets, saying, Jehu is king.” 

Why did others cut branches from trees and lay them before the colt in Christ’s path? The branches referred to here are almost certainly from palm trees, which are everywhere in that part of the world. Although First and Second Maccabees are not inspired Scripture and have no place in the Bible, they are history books that were written centuries before the time of Christ. Let me read First Maccabees 13.51: 

“On the twenty-third day of the second month, in the year one hundred and seventy-one, the Jews entered the citadel with shouts of jubilation, waving of palm branches, the music of harps and cymbals and lyres, and the singing of hymns and canticles, because a great enemy of Israel had been destroyed.”[1] 

Now from Second Maccabees 10.7: 

“Carrying rods entwined with leaves, green branches and palms, they sang hymns of grateful praise to him who had brought about the purification of his own Place.”[2] 

We can see that palm branches played as much a part of public celebration to the Jewish people as waving streamers and banners do in modern celebrations. Those people were seriously celebrating.

Before I read Mark 11.9-10, which contains the fullest account of what the multitudes cried out during the procession, I read the last half of Luke 19.37: 

“the whole multitude of the disciples began to rejoice and praise God with a loud voice for all the mighty works that they had seen.” 

From this, we conclude that a large number of those who had gathered had been witness to some of the miracles our Lord had worked. Did they see blind Bartimaeus receive his sight? Were they on hand when Lazarus was raised from the dead? Were some of them nearby when the lepers were cleansed? Perhaps they were in Capernaum when Jairus’ daughter was raised from the dead, or when the woman with the issue of blood was healed. Whatever the case, there was no doubt among those in the crowd that Jesus Christ worked miracles.

I read Psalm 118.25-26: 

25  Save now, I beseech thee, O LORD: O LORD, I beseech thee, send now prosperity.

26  Blessed be he that cometh in the name of the LORD: we have blessed you out of the house of the LORD. 

If we reflect on Mark 11.9-10 once more, we notice the crowd’s behavior to be a reminder of what we have just read in Psalm 118.25-26, and consider the four things recorded for us: 

“Hosanna; Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord: Blessed be the kingdom of our father David, that cometh in the name of the Lord: Hosanna in the highest.” 

We begin with their shout of “Hosanna.” The word Hosanna in Mark 11.9 is a transliteration of the Hebrew words that are translated “Save now” in Psalm 118.25.[3] 

By the first century, however, its use in Ps. 118 was no longer understood literally as a cry by those shouting it for God (or on this occasion, perhaps for Jesus) to now save the people of Israel from their enemies. Being repeated by pilgrims each year at the various major festivals, it had become more idiomatic in nature and was by then an expression of joy and jubilation, much as in the use of the word today. . . . A present-day example is the now-idiomatic nature of the expression “Praise the Lord.” This is not understood as command (or even request) to do something but a statement of thanksgiving.[4] 

Next, we consider the phrase, 

“Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord.” 

This is the very first time the word “blessed” appears in Mark’s Gospel, and it is part of a direct quote of the Septuagint translation of the first half of Psalm 118.26.[5] As well, this phrase, being part of a “pilgrim psalm, was addressed from the temple to every pilgrim entering Jerusalem.”[6] Thus, while this phrase is not messianic in character, it is an acknowledgment of Christ’s arrival at the Temple. On the other hand, the next phrase most definitely is messianic in character: 

“Blessed be the kingdom of our father David, that cometh in the name of the Lord.” 

Mark 10.46-48: 

46  And they came to Jericho: and as he went out of Jericho with his disciples and a great number of people, blind Bartimaeus, the son of Timaeus, sat by the highway side begging.

47  And when he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to cry out, and say, Jesus, thou Son of David, have mercy on me.

48  And many charged him that he should hold his peace: but he cried the more a great deal, Thou Son of David, have mercy on me. 

Bartimaeus, the blind man in Jericho, was the first person the Gospel accounts record to publicly acknowledge the Lord Jesus to be the Messiah by openly addressing Him, 

“Jesus, thou Son of David.” 

Bartimaeus spoke these words only three or perhaps four days earlier. Thus, one man publicly addressed the Lord Jesus in messianic terms, and three days later thousands are doing the very same thing, by connecting the Lord Jesus Christ’s entrance into “the kingdom of our father David.” The crowd also shouted, “Hosanna to the Son of David.”[7] With the thousands of people in the large crowd openly acknowledging the Lord Jesus Christ as being linked to David’s kingdom, as being the Messiah, and as representing the God of Israel (“that cometh in the name of the Lord”), imagine the panic and envy that must have ever more quickly spread among the Jewish ruling class. The last phrase is “Hosanna in the highest,” which is “a reverent way of speaking of God in heaven.”[8] So, in the space of seconds, the crowd shouts “Hosanna to the Son of David” and “Hosanna in the highest” to this Man sitting on a donkey colt as He enters the city in fulfillment of Messianic prophecy, the first phrase speaking of the Messiah and the second phrase speaking of God. Is it any wonder that Paul declares Jesus Christ to be our Lord in Romans 1.3, to be our source of grace and peace with God in Romans 1.7, to be the means by which God dispenses grace to us in First Corinthians 1.4, Who of God is made unto us wisdom, and righteousness, and sanctification, and redemption, First Corinthians 1.30, Who gave Himself for our sins, Galatians 1.4, and in whom we have redemption through His blood, the forgiveness of sins, Ephesians 1.7? Whether one studies the epistles of the New Testament, the typology of the Old Testament, or the life of Christ in the four Gospel accounts, it is abundantly evident that my Lord Jesus Christ is the image of the invisible God and that in all things He should have the preeminence. 

Next, THE DESCRIPTION OF THE WITNESSES 

John 12.17-19: 

17  The people therefore that was with him when he called Lazarus out of his grave, and raised him from the dead, bare record.

18  For this cause the people also met him, for that they heard that he had done this miracle.

19  The Pharisees therefore said among themselves, Perceive ye how ye prevail nothing? behold, the world is gone after him. 

There are five recognizable groups of people who were witness to the Lord Jesus Christ’s triumphal entry into Jerusalem:

First, of course, there were those who were part of His regular entourage. To be sure, the Lord Jesus Christ had intimates. Among them were undoubtedly James, Peter and John among the apostles, as well as Lazarus, Mary, and Martha. Beyond His intimates, however, there were those who were with Him constantly as He traveled about. Among them were the seventy who had been sent out two by two, as we are told in Luke 10.1 and 17. Then there were the women who followed Him from Galilee, that are mentioned in Luke chapters 23 and 24 and include Mary Magdalene, and Joanna, and Mary, the mother of James.

Next, there would be those religious pilgrims who the Lord Jesus and His party walked with from Jericho, where He had given sight to blind Bartimaeus, through the Wadi Qilt on their trek to Jerusalem for Passover. Somehow they lost track of the Savior, enabling Him to go to Bethany to spend a private Sabbath with Lazarus and his sisters, but they certainly rushed to Him when they heard He was riding into Jerusalem on the donkey colt a few days later.

We have already considered the multitudes who placed their garments and palm branches in the way. These would be those who were already in Jerusalem and who had not witnessed anything the Lord Jesus Christ had done. However, they were excitable and very responsive to the mood of those around them. Those around them, including those who constantly traveled with the Lord and those who had walked with Him from Jericho, were thrilled with anticipation. For centuries there had been no hope anywhere in the world, but what the Lord Jesus both said and did give almost everyone hopes that things could be and that things would be better.

The fourth group is mentioned in John 12.17-18: 

17  The people therefore that was with him when he called Lazarus out of his grave, and raised him from the dead, bare record.

18  For this cause the people also met him, for that they heard that he had done this miracle. 

Here John is telling us why so many gathered. The Lord Jesus already had a considerable following, but the real attraction and energy was supplied by some who had been on hand at Mary and Martha’s home a month before and had witnessed the Lord call Lazarus forth from the tomb, four days after he had died. Remember from John chapter 11 that many present there were not originally favorably inclined to the Him, but His miracle-working power was undeniable. Their record of that great miracle certainly fed the crowd’s intensity and growth.

The fifth group was the only ones who were sour about our Lord’s triumphal entry. Some of them had been present to witness Christ’s raising of Lazarus or were Pharisees who were strongly set against Him. Notice their pessimism, in verse 19: 

“The Pharisees therefore said among themselves, Perceive ye how ye prevail nothing? behold, the world is gone after him.” 

They were bitter because nothing they said or did diminished the fondness the crowds had for the Lord Jesus. They were losing their spiritual influence over the masses, and they were not at all happy about it. Why were these Pharisees opposed to our Lord? Keep in mind that the Pharisees occupied a place in the religious life of the Jewish people that was not legitimate. The priests were seen as compromising with the Romans, so the Pharisees set themselves up as the militant religionists who were holding the line against moral laxity and a loose observance of the Law. Of course, the Lord Jesus Christ threatened all that because He was real. Therefore, the Pharisees had to oppose Him at all costs or lose their influence with the common man. So, it did not matter to them that He worked miracles. All that mattered to them was that their position was threatened. That same dynamic works in Churches today. There are people who hunger for prominence, whether God wants them to be prominent or not. Sometimes even husbands and wives become obstacles to their spouse’s growth and development for fear of the other becoming prominent or growing in a direction they cannot go because of their lost condition. God help the person God’s hand is on who seeks to exalt the Savior. The modern day Pharisee will stand opposed for the sole purpose of protecting his position and maintaining his influence. Serving God and being faithful does not enter into the consideration at all. Thank God we have little of that in our Church. 

Third, THE DUTY TO PRAISE HIM 

Luke 19.39-40: 

39  And some of the Pharisees from among the multitude said unto him, Master, rebuke thy disciples.

40  And he answered and said unto them, I tell you that, if these should hold their peace, the stones would immediately cry out. 

It may interest you to know that “This is the last reference to Pharisees in the Third Gospel.”[9] While their reaction to the celebration and the praise directed toward our Lord during His triumphal entry is not characteristic of all Pharisees, these individuals exemplify all who set themselves over against the divine plan. They are those in Luke 19.14 said, “will not have this man to reign over us”; who did not know the time of their visitation, verse 44.

Notice that they address Him as “master.” This address was typically used for our Lord by those outside His circle of followers. You will remember that Nicodemus said to Him early on in His public ministry, 

“Rabbi, we know that thou art a teacher come from God: for no man can do these miracles that thou doest, except God be with him,” 

back in John 3.2. 

“Master, rebuke thy disciples.” 

It is apparent that these Pharisees are convinced the adoration and praise heaped on the Lord Jesus Christ are contrary to God’s will, and they want Him to side with them in opposing the public display. This shows their utter lack of comprehension concerning the divine purpose and exposes their blindness toward the Lord Jesus respecting His relationship with God. Interesting, is it not, that the so-called professionals, the strict religionists known as Pharisees, were blind to the Savior while the common people who were caught up in the excitement of rejoicing and praising Him were doing precisely what God wanted them to do?

Our Lord not only refuses to comply with their insistence that He rebukes His disciples, but He offers a startling reply: 

“I tell you that, if these should hold their peace, the stones would immediately cry out.” 

This is what is called a first class conditional sentence, whereby our Lord states that if the if clause is fulfilled, the protasis, the then clause will then be fulfilled, the apodosis.[10] What an astonishing thing to say. What do you think He meant? On the one hand, our Lord is once again asserting His deity. “Scripture often speaks of inanimate nature praising God. Cf. Pss. 96:11; 98:7-9; 114:7; Is. 55:12. Cf. also the words of John the Baptist in Matt. 3:9, note the fulfillment of Jesus’ words in Matt. 27:51.”[11] However, it is also likely that our Lord is at the same time alluding to Habakkuk 2.11, which reads, 

“For the stone shall cry out of the wall, and the beam out of the timber shall answer it.” 

Some background is in order to appreciate what I think our Lord was suggesting by His answer to the Pharisees. The prophet Habakkuk was consoled by God that the just shall live by faith, Habakkuk 2.4, and the Chaldeans will be visited by God with five woes in due time for their wickedness. They built their empire by ransacking and pillaging others, using stolen material to build their houses. When God’s judgment does fall on them “the stone shall cry out of the wall,” Habakkuk 2.11, crying out that justice be done.

The stones our Lord says would cry out should not be thought of as stones on the ground. Jerusalem is an entire city built for the most part with stone. As the Lord Jesus Christ passed into the city on the foal of an ass, He responded that if the people did not praise Him the stones in the walls will praise Him. He is referring to the stones used to build the Temple since He is the chief cornerstone that is rejected. If justice is not done by the people praising and worshiping the Lord Jesus during His triumphal entry, then the stones used to built the walls around the city, the stones used to build the houses in the city, and more likely the stones used to build their great Temple would immediately cry out.

Is it not a testament to the blindness and wickedness of man that inanimate creation knows to worship Him, yet so many do not recognize their Creator to bow down before Him? 

Fourth, ‘THIS THY DAY’ 

Luke 19.41-44: 

41  And when he was come near, he beheld the city, and wept over it,

42  Saying, If thou hadst known, even thou, at least in this thy day, the things which belong unto thy peace! but now they are hid from thine eyes.

43  For the days shall come upon thee, that thine enemies shall cast a trench about thee, and compass thee round, and keep thee in on every side,

44  And shall lay thee even with the ground, and thy children within thee; and they shall not leave in thee one stone upon another; because thou knewest not the time of thy visitation. 

These are an astonishing four verses, in which are contained not only the fulfillment of a prophecy made centuries before, but a prediction that would be harshly fulfilled within the lives of most who heard Him speak these words: 

Verse 41: 

“And when he was come near, he beheld the city, and wept over it.” 

The Lord rode along in the midst of the throng of people, then at some point, He beheld the city (though it was not where He could earliest have seen it). He lifted up His eyes and took it all in since the Greek word here is the particular word for “Behold!” At this point, our Lord wept. I do not think we see here a reference to tears coursing down His cheeks, such as when He stood before the tomb of Lazarus. A different word is used, that suggests the likelihood of sobbing.[12] 

Verse 42: 

“Saying, If thou hadst known, even thou, at least in this thy day, the things which belong unto thy peace! but now they are hid from thine eyes.” 

Our Lord is bemoaning (Is that a fair description of our Lord’s expression?) the ignorance of Jerusalem. If they had known, if only they had known, at least in this their day, the things related to their peace. Now, however, those things are hidden from their eyes. The people of Jerusalem were ignorant, but they are also without excuse. I read from Daniel 9.24-27: 

24  Seventy weeks are determined upon thy people and upon thy holy city, to finish the transgression, and to make an end of sins, and to make reconciliation for iniquity, and to bring in everlasting righteousness, and to seal up the vision and prophecy, and to anoint the most Holy.

25  Know therefore and understand, that from the going forth of the commandment to restore and to build Jerusalem unto the Messiah the Prince shall be seven weeks, and threescore and two weeks: the street shall be built again, and the wall, even in troublous times.

26  And after threescore and two weeks shall Messiah be cut off, but not for himself: and the people of the prince that shall come shall destroy the city and the sanctuary; and the end thereof shall be with a flood, and unto the end of the war desolations are determined.

27  And he shall confirm the covenant with many for one week: and in the midst of the week he shall cause the sacrifice and the oblation to cease, and for the overspreading of abominations he shall make it desolate, even until the consummation, and that determined shall be poured upon the desolate. 

It just so happens that the sixty-nine weeks of years that intervened from the time the decree was issued to rebuild Jerusalem, 483 years, ended on this day that Jesus Christ triumphantly entered the city. A great thing? Yes, but also a tragic thing, because the Jewish people had the information at their fingertips but were blindly ignorant of this singular opportunity. Whereas the people had been blind from ignorance, they would henceforth be judicially blinded by God, as Romans 11.7-8 confirms. I urge you to read it when you get home. 

Luke 19.43-44: 

43  For the days shall come upon thee, that thine enemies shall cast a trench about thee, and compass thee round, and keep thee in on every side,

44  And shall lay thee even with the ground, and thy children within thee; and they shall not leave in thee one stone upon another; because thou knewest not the time of thy visitation. 

The Lord Jesus Christ describes five hostile activities against the city of Jerusalem, which would be horribly fulfilled in 70 AD when the Romans sacked the city. First, verse 43, 

“thine enemies shall cast a trench about thee.” 

This is reminiscent of Isaiah 29.3: 

“And I will camp against thee round about, and will lay siege against thee with a mount, and I will raise forts against thee.” 

Next

“thine enemies shall . . . compass thee round.” 

This echoes Second Kings 6.14: 

“Therefore sent he thither horses, and chariots, and a great host: and they came by night, and compassed the city about.” 

Third

“thine enemies shall . . . keep thee in on every side.” 

This echoes Ezekiel 4.2: 

“And lay siege against it, and build a fort against it, and cast a mount against it; set the camp also against it, and set battering rams against it round about.” 

Fourth, verse 44, 

“And shall lay thee even with the ground, and thy children within thee.” 

This echoes the taunt of Psalm 137.8-9: 

8  O daughter of Babylon, who art to be destroyed; happy shall he be, that rewardeth thee as thou hast served us.

9  Happy shall he be, that taketh and dasheth thy little ones against the stones. 

Verse 44 concludes, 

“because thou knewest not the time of thy visitation.” 

Because they did not know the time of Christ’s visitation to bring to them grace, mercy, and salvation, this same visitation became the basis for the divine judgment that would rain down on them in 70 AD. The destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans was comparable to the destruction of Hiroshima by the atomic bomb, with no stone left unturned. The city was stripped of absolutely everything. The Savior wept and sobbed with compassion for His people because their willful ignorance brought upon their heads a judgment from God that could have been avoided. The price of sin, even the sin of ignorance, is very high, indeed. 

Finally, HIS ARRIVAL TO JERUSALEM 

Matthew 21.10-11: 

10 And when he was come into Jerusalem, all the city was moved, saying, Who is this?

11 And the multitude said, This is Jesus the prophet of Nazareth of Galilee. 

Up to this point in the accounts of the triumphal entry, we have been examining the Lord Jesus Christ has been approaching the city of Jerusalem, coming from Bethphage, cresting the shoulder of the Mount of Olives on the donkey colt, and riding down into and then up out of the Kidron Valley. The hoopla and celebration have, to this point, taken place outside the city. However, these two verses record His actual entrance into the city. 

“And when he was come into Jerusalem, all the city was moved.” 

The Greek word translated “was moved” is the verb form of the Greek word we get seismic from, seismos, and refers to shock, agitation, and earthquake.[13] In other words, these people are rocked. This is a description of a social upheaval. 

“all the city was moved, saying, Who is this?” 

This is a legitimate question. Though the Lord Jesus Christ had been in and out of Jerusalem over the last three years, and admitting that the Pharisees and the religious professionals were very much aware of His presence, it is highly likely that the average guy in the street in the city has been so focused on his personal affairs that he has never paid any attention to what transpired outside the city. They may not know who He is. 

Verse 12: 

“And the multitude said, This is Jesus the prophet of Nazareth of Galilee.” 

His followers know who He is. Those who gathered around Him in Jericho when He gave sight to Bartimaeus know who He is. 

“This is Jesus the prophet of Nazareth of Galilee.” 

Three things about this chorus response by the multitudes: First, His name is Jesus. Names were important to them. Names had significance. This one’s name means Jehovah is salvation, or Jehovah saves. This is the same name Moses’ servant, Joshua the son of Nun, had, which would not be lost on anyone. Next

“This is Jesus the prophet.” 

This is doubtless a reference to the prediction found in Deuteronomy 18.15-19: 

15 The LORD thy God will raise up unto thee a Prophet from the midst of thee, of thy brethren, like unto me; unto him ye shall hearken;

16 According to all that thou desiredst of the LORD thy God in Horeb in the day of the assembly, saying, Let me not hear again the voice of the LORD my God, neither let me see this great fire any more, that I die not.

17 And the LORD said unto me, They have well spoken that which they have spoken.

18 I will raise them up a Prophet from among their brethren, like unto thee, and will put my words in his mouth; and he shall speak unto them all that I shall command him.

19 And it shall come to pass, that whosoever will not hearken unto my words which he shall speak in my name, I will require it of him. 

This is a significant passage concerning the Jewish Messiah, and no doubt struck fear into the hearts of the Jerusalem citizens, knowing that anyone with a messianic claim would provoke hostilities with the Romans who occupied the city. The passage concludes with, 

“Jesus the prophet of Nazareth of Galilee.” 

Thus, this prophet is an outsider. He has nothing to do with the Jerusalem religious establishment. He is from Galilee, from the city of Nazareth. Therefore, there will be no brokering with Him, no deals with Him.

Do you get a better idea of the dynamic of the city? Those who were religious pilgrims and outsiders might be more sympathetic to the claims of Christ, since they had less to lose, while those who were entrenched in the religious establishment and bureaucracy, and who had working relationships with the Romans and the Herodians, stood to lose everything. 

Be careful when you think you have something to lose by acknowledging Jesus to be Lord. What you are fearful of losing by becoming one of Jesus Christ’s disciples is a threat to your soul’s destiny.

__________

[1] The New American Bible, (Nashville: Thomas Nelson, Publishers, 1971), page 533.

[2] Ibid., page 553.

[3] See footnote for Matthew 21.9 from John MacArthur, The MacArthur Study Bible, (Nashville: Word Publishing, 1997), page 1431.

[4] Robert H. Stein, Mark, (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2008), page 505.

[5] G. K. Beale and D. A. Carson, Commentary On The New Testament Use Of The Old Testament, (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2007), page 206.

[6] Stein, page 505.

[7] Matthew 21.9

[8] R. T. France, The Gospel Of Matthew, (Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2007), page 780.

[9] Joel B. Green, The Gospel Of Luke, (Grand Rapids, MI: William B Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1997), page 687.

[10] Ray Summers, Essentials of New Testament Greek, (Nashville, Tennessee: Broadman Press, 1950), pages 108-109.

[11] See footnote for Luke 19.40 from John MacArthur, The MacArthur Study Bible, (Nashville: Word Publishing, 1997), page 1554.

[12] Bauer, Danker, A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and other Early Christian Literature, (Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press, 2000), page 545.

[13] Ibid., page 918.

Would you like to contact Dr. Waldrip about this sermon? Please contact him by clicking on the link below. Please do not change the subject within your email message. Thank you.

pastor@calvaryroadbaptist.org